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How Colorado drivers should prepare for avalanches

January and February might be over, but it takes a while for Colorado’s winters to go away. You can find evidence of this from an incident just a few days ago on March 4, 2019. Several highways had to be closed down due to avalanches coming down on the drivers in Summit County. Many drivers needed assistance getting out of the heavy snow with their vehicles.

Colorado is a state where the likelihood of this happening again is much higher compared to the rest of the nation. With how many mountainous areas are around here, local motorists should know when not to drive past certain areas and how to respond if they end up getting buried. Irrational, brash thinking could result in serious injuries or even death.

Keep your eyes and ears open

Most of the times, checking on road conditions online or listening to the television or radio will give you a good idea of when certain areas are not ok to go through. Since Colorado gets plenty of snow during the winter as it is, news stations may not warn you about avalanches right away. This means you might want to consider checking it a couple more times after hours have passed to see if anything has changed. Avalanches are relatively unpredictable, so that’s why you need to check which roads are shut down along with the weather forecast.

Additionally, some mountains may have warning signs telling you if they are highly vulnerable to rock slides and avalanches. If you see a sign for either one and know that a heavy blizzard is on the way, you should check to see if there are any alternate pathways and inform whoever you are going to you might be late or not coming at all.

Getting ready for the worst outcome

If you are unfortunate enough to get pushed off the road from an avalanche, do not panic. You need to stay in your vehicle for a little while because you do not know when the avalanche will stop. It is especially difficult to get out on your own if you can’t see out of your windows, so you should wait for an emergency vehicle to help dig you out.

Additionally, you need to turn your vehicle off. You cannot move, you would waste gas and you could suffer from carbon monoxide poisoning. The snow covering your car is cold, but it also insulates your interior enough where you don’t have to rely on your heater.

Make sure you have the right items in your car to make staying there a little easier. You should have emergency blankets in your car during the winter to survive cold crashes like this. Your most crucial tool is your cell phone so you can contact an emergency vehicle to help dig you out of the snow. Make sure it has enough battery to help you call anyone you need to talk to, whether it’d be 911 or your friends and family.

Drivers that do not respond to avalanches properly can endanger themselves and other motorists in the process. Additionally, some Colorado avalanches are man-made from someone else’s negligence. If you or a loved one suffered from someone else’s mistake, contact a local motor vehicle accident attorney before discussing the matter with your insurance company.

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