Set yourself up for success with the way you ask for a divorce

Published By | Aug 26, 2019 | Divorce |

As you begin to consider divorce, it’s easy for your mind to wander into the future. You begin to think about what your life will be like after your marriage is in the past.

It’s a good idea to plan for the future, but don’t get ahead of yourself. If you neglect to take the proper steps up front, it’s possible you could cause yourself additional harm in the future.

The first step in filing for divorce is notifying your spouse of your intentions. There is no perfect way to ask for a divorce, but there are some tips you can follow to ease the tension:

  • Prepare yourself for a difficult conversation: Even if your spouse shares your feelings about your marriage, they may be taken aback when you finally ask for a divorce. Have a clear idea of what you want to say, how you’ll say it and how your spouse may react.
  • Give yourself enough time: This is an important conversation that you don’t want to rush. Leave enough time in your schedule to ensure that you touch on all the most important aspects of your situation.
  • Don’t change your mind: Maybe you begin to get cold feet. Or maybe your spouse asks you to reconsider. If you turn back now, it will be more difficult to file for divorce in the future. Once you’re sure that it’s the best solution to your marital problems, stick to your plan.
  • Don’t discuss the details of your divorce: There’s more to getting a divorce than simply telling your spouse. You also need to negotiate on key areas such as property division and child custody. Don’t discuss these details shortly after asking for a divorce, as it’s likely to result in a serious disagreement.

The manner in which you ask for divorce is more important than most people realize. By following these tips, you’re in position to not only ask for a divorce but to prepare yourself for the process to follow.

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